Parrot Species - R through S

Racket-tailed Parrots

Racket-tailed Parrots

species image

Racket-tailed Parrots

Racket-tailed parrots are easily distinguished from all other parrots by their elongated central tail feathers with the bare shaft and spatula at the end (please refer to drawing to the right)..

Overall the plumage is green with more or less blue or red, specifes-specific highlights.

Adult parrots average 30 cm in length.

Red Shining Parrots

Red Shining Parrots

species image

Red Shining Parrots

The Red Shining-parrot (Prosopeia tabuensis) is endemic to the islands of Vanua Levu and Taveuni in Fiji. Most populations exist in or near the forests on the islands of Kadavu and Ono.

This parrot species was also introduced to southern Tonga - specifically Eua and Tongatapu Islands.

Its favored habitats include subtropical or tropical moist lowland and mangrove forest areas.

The Crimson Shining Parrot (Prosopeia splendens) is sometimes considered conspecific with Red Shining Parrot (Prosopeia tabuensis) (of, or belonging to, the same species), but may be closer to the Masked Shining Parrots (Prosopeia personata). The Crimson Shining Parrot is now considered monotypic (a genus consisting of only one species). 

Red-billed Parrots aka Sordid or Coral-billed Parrots

Red-billed Parrots aka Sordid or Coral-billed Parrots

species image

Red-billed Pionus or Coral-billed Pionus Parrot

The Red-billed Parrot averages 11 inches (28 cm) in length. The plumage is generally olive-green. The head is also olive-green except the feathers to the crown and back of the head are broadly edged with dark-blue. The cheeks are olive with blue tips. There is a blue band across the throat and upper breast. The breast and abdomen are dull olive, each feather with duller edging tinged bluish-pink. The under tail-coverts are red. The back is dull olive-green, each feather with olive-brown markings. The middle tail-feathers are green and the outers are blue with red at the base. They have red bills with a paler base. Their eye rings are grey and their irises dark brown. They have grey feet.

Young birds have a pale green head, and yellowish-green under tail-coverts with a few red feathers.

Red-cheeked Parrots

Red-cheeked Parrots

species image

Red-cheeked Parrots

As Red-cheeked (geoffroyus), but generally darker; reddish-brown patch to wing-coverts absent; blue crown and back of head extends to nape, there adjoining pale blue band; back variably tinged bronze-brown; breast and abdomen with bluish-green tinge; under wing-coverts darker blue; generally larger. Female as nominate type, but brown of head extends to nape; there adjoining a very broad pale blue band; crown tinged bluish; back variably tinged bronze-brown; breast and abdomen with bluish-green tinge. ... Length: 25 cm (10 ins), wing length 170 - 185 mm (6.5 - 7 ins)

Red-cheeked Parrots

Red-cheeked Parrots

species image

Red-cheeked Parrots

The Red-cheeked Parrot averages 8 to 8.4 inches (~21 cm) in length and weigh around 4.7 to 6.3 oz (135 - 180 g).

Its general plumage is green. The forehead, throat and sides of the head are red. The crown and the back of the head are mauve-blue. The breast, abdomen, tail upperside, upper and lower tail-coverts are yellow-green. The lower back is green. There is a reddish-brown patch to the median wing-coverts. The under wing-coverts are blue. The underside of the tail is green-yellow. It has pale yellow irises. The feet are grey. The upper beak is coral red and the lower beak is brown-grey.

Female look like males for the most part, except her head is brown and there is an olive tinge to her cheeks and throat. The upper and lower beak is brown-grey. (Please refer to the image below to the right.)

Red-crowned Parakeets or Kākāriki

Red-crowned Parakeets or Kākāriki

species image

Red-crowned Parakeets or Kākāriki

The Red-crowned Parakeet was once widespread across the islands and mainland of New Zealand. It was extremely abundant during the 1880s and irruptions occurred in a number of locations due to their vulnerability to introduced species, particularly stoats, rats and possums.

At one time, this species was considered "effectively" extinct on the mainland of New Zealand, although recent records indicate that small groups of them still exist. Some cage escapes / releases or vagrants from offshore island populations have also established themselves.

The Field Guide to the Birds of New Zealand' - B.D. Heather and H.A. Robertson; 2005; 440pp; Viking states as follows: "Common to abundant on many islands free of mammalian predators. Very rare on the mainland." ... "In the North Island, a few are now found in heavy forest of western Northland, the central North Island and the Rushine Range" ... "[V]agrants visit bush patches along the eastern coast of Northland from nearby island."

For the most part, this species is confined to Stewart Island/Rakiura and a number of offshore islands (such as Kapiti Island, Tiritiri Matangi Island and Matiu/Somes Island) as well as the Kermadec Islands to the north of New Zealand, on the Auckland Islands to the south and the Chatham Islands to the east.

The two island populations are sometimes afforded subspecific status. They are considered vulnerable by the IUCN and BirdLife International because the remaining populations are highly fragmented.

According to the Porirua City News (17 November, page 8) published in October 2004, two pairs of Red-crowned Parakeets were seen in the Porirua Scenic Reserve, probably having flown from Kapiti Island.

Red-lored Parrots

Red-lored Parrots

species image

Red-lored Amazon Parrots aka Yellow-cheek Amazon Parrots

The Red-lored Amazon averages 12 - 13.6 inches (30 to 35 cm) in length (including tail) with a wingspan from 15 to 17 inches (38 to 43 cm). The average weight is 310-480g.

The plumage is primarily green, with red forehead, in some subspecies yellow cheeks (sometimes with red spots). The crown is blue and thick. The tip of the lower beak is gray horn; the upper beak is light horn-colored. The feet are light to dark grey.

Males and females look alike; although some breeders opine that mature females have brown irises while mature males have a golden iris. If identifying the correct sex is important, this imprecise technique may not suffice and DNA sexing is recommended.

Juveniles have less yellow on cheeks, less red on forehead, and dark irises.

Ring-neck Parrots / Parakeets aka Ringnecks

Ring-neck Parrots / Parakeets aka Ringnecks

species image

Asiatic, African Parakeets / Ringneck or Long-tailed Parakeets

The vibrant and colorful ringneck parrots are visually appealing and tame easily. Most of them readily breed in captivity resulting in an ample supply of young birds for the pet trade.

Owners describe them as smart birds that learn concepts quickly and love to show off. Many of them are very talented talkers, speaking with a clarity that can easily be compared to that of the Quakers, Grays and Amazons - species well known for their talking abilities. Contrary to rumors, both the male and the female are capable of speech. They learn words and phrases in a very short span of time without any training for the most part. They just learn by listening. Of course, should training be provided, their vocabulary can be significantly increased.

Rodriguez Parrots

Rodriguez Parrots

species image

Rodriguez Parrots

The Rodrigues Parrot (Necropsittacus rodericanus) is an extinct species of parrot which once lived on the Mascarene island of Rodrigues. It is known from subfossil bones and the 1708 description of Leguat as well as the 1726 report of Julien Tafforet.

The birds were described as generally of green coloration, with a large head and beak and a long tail, and being in size markedly larger than a pigeon, or considerably so than the local parakeet.

Rose-faced Parrots

Rose-faced Parrots

species image

Rose-faced Parrots

The Rose-faced Parrot averages 9 to 9.5 inches (23 - 34 cm) in length and weighs around 7.1 to 7.3 oz.

The plumage of both males and females is mainly green. They have a dark grey/brown crown to the nape and distinctive rose/pink lores (the regions between the eyes and bill on the side of a bird's head) to the area around eyes, the ear coverts (feathers covering the ears) and the hindcheeks. They have a pale rose chin and forecheeks. The hindneck is dull olive/yellow, reaching to the breast where it turns to a greenish color. The lesser wing-coverts and forewings are orange and yellow. Their green tail is tipped with blue, with red at the base. The bill is horn-colored. The eye rings are white and the irises are pale- yellow.

Females look like the male, but are generally smaller.

Immatures lack the full coloring to the face. The rose/pink on the face are confined to the superciliary line and ear coverts (feathers covering the ears). There is more green to the crown and nape. They have green/brown cheeks and chin. The breast is interspersed with green and there is an olive/yellow tinge to the breast. The irises are darker.

Rose-ringed Parakeets

Rose-ringed Parakeets

species image

Rose-ringed Parakeets

The Rose-ringed Parakeets (Psittacula krameri) - also known as Ring-necked Parakeets - are endemic to Northern and West Africa in Guinea, Senegal and southern Mauretania east to western Uganda and southern Sudan; as well as Southern Asia (depending on the sub-species).

These gregarious tropical parakeets are popular in the pet industry, and their numbers are decreasing in some areas due to trapping for the pet trade. The Rose-ringed Parakeet's population has dropped dramatically in many areas of the Indian subcontinent.

In India, the royals prized them as pets and for their ability to speak; and owning one of these birds, represented a popular status symbol in the Indian culture.

These beautiful and elegant birds can live 25 to 30 years.

Rose-ringed Parakeets

Rose-ringed Parakeets

species image

Rose-ringed Parakeets

The Rose-ringed Parakeets (Psittacula krameri) - also known as Ring-necked Parakeets - are endemic to Northern and West Africa in Guinea, Senegal and southern Mauretania east to western Uganda and southern Sudan; as well as Southern Asia (depending on the sub-species).

These gregarious tropical parakeets are popular in the pet industry, and their numbers are decreasing in some areas due to trapping for the pet trade. The Rose-ringed Parakeet's population has dropped dramatically in many areas of the Indian subcontinent.

In India, the royals prized them as pets and for their ability to speak; and owning one of these birds, represented a popular status symbol in the Indian culture.

These beautiful and elegant birds can live 25 to 30 years.

Rose-ringed Parakeets

Rose-ringed Parakeets

species image

Rose-ringed Parakeets

The Rose-ringed Parakeets (Psittacula krameri) - also known as Ring-necked Parakeets - are endemic to Northern and West Africa in Guinea, Senegal and southern Mauretania east to western Uganda and southern Sudan; as well as Southern Asia (depending on the sub-species).

These gregarious tropical parakeets are popular in the pet industry, and their numbers are decreasing in some areas due to trapping for the pet trade. The Rose-ringed Parakeet's population has dropped dramatically in many areas of the Indian subcontinent.

In India, the royals prized them as pets and for their ability to speak; and owning one of these birds, represented a popular status symbol in the Indian culture.

These beautiful and elegant birds can live 25 to 30 years.

Rüppell's Parrots, Ruppel's or Rueppel's Parrots

Rüppell's Parrots, Ruppel's or Rueppel's Parrots

species image

Rüppell's Parrots, Ruppel's or Rueppel's Parrots

The Rueppell's Parrot or Rüppell's Parrot (Poicephalus rueppellii) is endemic in Southwestern Africa, specifically central Namibia and southwest Angola to Luanda. They are usually seen in small flocks of up to 20 - but more can congregate in areas where food is plentyful.

Their preferred habitats range from riparian woodland to Acacia, dry steppe and thornveld as well as palm tree stands, such as Northern lala palm in the northern parts of its range. In its southerly range, it generally occurs in mixed Acacia woodland and cluster-leafs stands. This species is generally more common near streams or rivers.

The name commemorates the German naturalist and explorer Eduard Rüppell.

The reported maximum longevity in captivity is 34.3 years.

Rusty-faced Parrots

Rusty-faced Parrots

species image

Rusty-faced Parrots (Hapalopsittaca / Hapalopsittica)

Size: Rusty-faced parrots are generally chunky and average 23 cm or 9 inches in length (including the tail).

Adults: The plumage is mostly green. The abdomen and under tail-coverts are yellowish-green. They have a dull orange crown and pale yellow lores (the regions between the eyes and bill on the side of a bird's head). The orange-red cheeks have a yellow streaking. The olive ear-coverts (feathers covering the ears) are slightly elongated with yellow shafts. They have red shoulders. The outer median and secondary wing-coverts are dark blue. The tail is brownish-red with a violet-blue tip. They have blue secondary coverts and dark bluish primaries (= longest wing feathers). The underside of the flight-feathers are greenish-blue. The bill is horn-colored with a bluish-grey base. They have dark grey eye (periophthalmic) rings. The irises are greenish-yellow and their feet are dark grey.

 

Young (immature) birds have yellow streaks to their ear-coverts and cheeks. The head is a duller red and the secondary wing feathers are green.

Saffron-headed Parrots

Saffron-headed Parrots

species image

Saffron-headed Parrots

The Saffron-headed Parrot averages 9.5 - 9.6 inches (~24 cm) in length.

The plumage is generally green, except the head and the throat that feature a bright yellow coloration. The ear coverts (feathers covering the ears) are washed with orange yellow. The breast and nape are olive-yellow. The thighs have some red and yellow feathers. The edge of the wings, the sides of the body and under wing-coverts are red. The primary wing feathers and wings are black - the latter with a bluish tinge and bluish-green edging. The lesser wing-coverts are green with a bluish tinge and the greater wing-coverts are blue with green edging. The central tail feathers have blue wing tips. The outer tail feathers have yellow to the inner webs. The irises are dark brown. The cere and feet are dark grey.

Immature birds have greenish heads. Their cheeks and ear coverts (feathers covering the ears) are tinged olive-yellow. The throat and breast are olive. The bend of the wing and wing-coverts are green with some red feathers. The edges of the wing are interspersed with green. The greater wing-coverts are green.

Santarém Tui Parakeets

Santarém Tui Parakeets

species image

Santarm Tui Parakeets

The Santarém Tui Parakeets is a little smaller than the nominate Tui Parakeet, averaging 6 inches (16 cm) in length. Although other than small difference in size, they look like the nominate species, but they have a variably marked stripe behind eye, and the yellow patch to the forehead is often more extensive (please refer to above image).

Senegal Parrots aka Yellow-vented Parrots

Senegal Parrots aka Yellow-vented Parrots

species image

Senegal Parrots aka Yellow-vented Parrots

The Senegal Parrots (Poicephalus senegalus senegalus) are probably the best known and most popular members of the entire Poicephalus family, which includes Meyer'sRed-bellied, and Jardine's Parrots.

These compact and very playful African parrots are frequently seen in pet shops around the USA and Europe, where they were heavily imported until their importation became illegal in 1992.

Senegal Parrots have a life expectancy of 20 - 30 years; however, some captive birds have been recorded to have lived close to 50 years.

Seychelles Parakeets

Seychelles Parakeets

species image

The Seychelles Parakeet averaged 16 ins (41 cm) in length. It resembled the Alexandrine parakeet, but was smaller and lacked the pink color in its collar. The general plumage was green; back of head, nape and narrow stripes to cheek washed with blue; broad cheek-stripe and obscure narrow line from cere to eye black; abdomen yellowish-green; purple-red patch on wing coverts; upperside of middle tail-feathers blue with yellow tips, outer feathers green; tail underside yellow; bill red with yellow tip; iris yellowish; feet grey.

Short-tailed Parrots or Sharp-tailed Parrots

Short-tailed Parrots or Sharp-tailed Parrots

species image

Short-tailed Parrots or Sharp-tailed Parrots

The Short-tailed Parrot occurs naturally in the rain forest of the tropical zone, with populations existing along both sides of the Amazon river in northernmost Brazil, south-eastern Colombia, eastern Ecuador and eastern Peru. It can also be found in the coastal deltas of French Guiana and Amapá - a Brazilian state located in the extreme north.

Outside the breeding season, they are usually found in large, noisy flocks that can be heard from a distance. They prefer trees along water courses. These parrots tend to gather towards the evenings on roosting trees.

Even though this species is considered common in parts of its range, speaking in general terms, this parrot is considered endangered in its natural habitat (CITES II) due to habitat destruction and capturing for the pet trade.

Singing Parrots or Yellow-headed Parrots

Singing Parrots or Yellow-headed Parrots

species image

Singing Parrots or Yellow-headed Parrots

The Singing Parrot averages ~9.75 to 10 inches (~25 cm) in length, from head to the tip of the tail; and weighs around 5.6 to 6.8 oz (160-195g).

Male: The general plumage is green. His head is yellow, edged with a greyish-mauve collar around the neck. The breast, abdomen, upperside of tail, upper and under-tail-coverts are yellowish-green. The lower back is green and there is a reddish-brown patch to the median wing-coverts. The under wing-coverts are violet-blue. The tail underside is dusky yellow. He has narrow grey periophthalmic rings and pale yellow irises. The feet are grey and the upper beak is pale horn-colored. The lower beak is dark grey.

Slaty-headed Parakeets

Slaty-headed Parakeets

species image

Slaty-headed Parakeets

The slaty-headed parakeet averages 15.5 - 16 inches (~40 cm) in length, with the tail being ~ 6 to 7 inches (~158 to 178 mm) long. Slatyheads are bigger than Plumheads. The hens are slightly smaller than the cock, the body approximately the same size as that of an Eastern Rosella.

A variety of mutations have been produced, including blue, olive, lutino and albino.

The original (natural) slaty-headed parakeet has a mostly green plumage. The head, however, is dark grey with a slight bluish hue, There are black stripes to the cheeks and a narrow band to nape, with an adjoining bluish-green band. There is a dark red patch to the wing-coverts. The under wing-coverts are greenish-blue. The middle tail-feathers are blue with a green base and yellow tips. The upper beak is red with a yellow tip. The lower beak is yellowish. The irises are whitish and the feet grey.

Females are either without or with a greatly reduced dark red patch to the wing-coverts.

Immatures have greenish head and brownish-green cheeks. There is a narrow green band to the nape. The upper and lower beaks are horn-colored with a brownish base to the lower beak. They attain their adult plumage when they are about 30 months old.

Slender-billed Conures aka Long-billed Conures

Slender-billed Conures aka Long-billed Conures

species image

Slender-billed Conures aka Long-billed Conures

Slender-billed Conures average 15-16 inches in length.

The general plumage is generally olive green. Their forehead, crown and neck feathers are edged with brownish black. The feathered lores (the regions between the eyes and bill on the side of a bird's head) and cere are crimson red. The center of abdomen is a maroon reddish color and the tail is brownish red with a tinge of green.

They have a dark grey bill. The upper beak is prolonged and slightly curved.

The irises are orange and the eyes are circled by a small grey periophthalmic ring.

Slender-billed Kea aka Norfolk Island Kaka

Slender-billed Kea aka Norfolk Island Kaka

species image

Nestorinae: Nestor Parrots aka Kaka aka New Zealand Kaka

Greenish-brown; forehead, crown and nape greyish-white, sometimes feathers tipped dull green; neck and abdomen brownish-red, hind-neck more crimson and with yellow and dark-brown margins; breast olive-brown; ear-coverts orange-yellow; rump, upper and under tail-coverts red edged with dark-brown; under wing-coverts and undersides of flight feathers crimson; tail brown with pale tips; iris dark-brown; feet dark grey; bill brownish-grey.

Female has shorter and less curved bill.

Immatures as adult, but with yellowish base to the lower beak.