Parrot Species - N through O

Nestorinae - Kea

Nestorinae - Kea

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Nestorinae - Kea

This parrot averages 19 inches or 48 cm in length. Both female and male Kea are alike in their dark olive-green coloration with each feather being edged with black. They have lighter feathers on the breast, belly and back. Both have red plumage on the napes of their necks and underneath the wings that can be easily seen while in flight. The only visible distinction between the sexes is their beak with the male having a larger longer curving upper beak. Males, who average around 48 cm in length, are also slightly larger in general than females, and on average weigh 5% more, with bill length and curvature about 14% more. However, a light male can weigh less than a heavy female. Juvenile Keas have bright yellow eyelids, cere and beak and their crown feathers have a yellowish tinge to them; fledglings typically acquire their adult plumage at around eighteen months of age, although it can take up to 4 years for juvenile keas to lose the yellow around their eyes.

Females have shorter and less curved bill. Immatures as adult, but with yellowish skin to periophthalmic ring, cere and base of lower beak, feet yellow-brown. They attain the adult plumage at 18 months.

Nestorinae: Nestor Parrots aka Kaka aka New Zealand Kaka

Nestorinae: Nestor Parrots aka Kaka aka New Zealand Kaka

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Nestorinae: Nestor Parrots aka Kaka aka New Zealand Kaka

The Kākā is a medium sized parrot, around 45 cm in length and weighing about 550 g, and is closely related to the Kea, but has darker plumage and is more arboreal.

Both sub-species have a strongly patterned brown/green/grey plumage with orange and scarlet flashes under the wings; color variants which show red to yellow coloration especially on the breast are sometimes found.

Nestorinae: Nestor Parrots aka Kaka aka New Zealand Kaka

Nestorinae: Nestor Parrots aka Kaka aka New Zealand Kaka

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Nestorinae: Nestor Parrots aka Kaka aka New Zealand Kaka

The Kākā is a medium sized parrot, around 45 cm in length and weighing about 550 g, and is closely related to the Kea, but has darker plumage and is more arboreal.

Both sub-species have a strongly patterned brown/green/grey plumage with orange and scarlet flashes under the wings; color variants which show red to yellow coloration especially on the breast are sometimes found.

Neumann's Ring-necked Parakeets

Neumann's Ring-necked Parakeets

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Neumann's Ring-necked Parakeets

The Neumann's Ringneck averages 17 ins (43 cm) in length, with a wing length of 6.5 - 7 ins (170 - 178 mm).

The Neumann's Ringneck is sometimes confused with other Ringneck species, especially the popular Indian Ringneck. The Neumann's Ringneck is a little larger than the African and Indian Ringnecks and is reported to be slightly more aggressive. Other than size, they are quite similar in appearance to the nominate form (African Ringneck), except the Neumann's Ringneck has less blue, which is limited to a narrow band at the nape. They also have pale grey coloring that appears on their breasts. Their beaks are a beautiful coral red and the lower beak may be partially or all black. Their bills are typically larger than that of the African Ringneck.

New Caledonian Parakeets

New Caledonian Parakeets

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New Caledonian Parakeets

It averages 6 cm or 10.25 inches in length, including tail. The wing length is about 114 - 135 mm or 4.5 - 5.25 inches.

It looks similar to the Red-fronted Parakeet; except the sides of the head, breast and abdomen are much more yellow. The red crown is paler. It is smaller in size.

Newton's Parakeets / Rodriguez Ring-necked Parakeets

Newton's Parakeets / Rodriguez Ring-necked Parakeets

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Newton's Parakeets / Rodriguez Ring-necked Parakeets

Newton's Parakeet was 40 cm (16 in) long, about half of the length being the length of its tail feathers.

Its general appearance was similar to the extant Psittacula species, and it had the black collar characteristic of its genus; however, it differed by its slate blue, not green, plumage. The specimens show it had a yellow iris, was a darker grey blue on its upper surfaces than lower surfaces, and the male had a dark line on its face running from its cere to its eyes, which was less prominent in the female.

The female had a greyer head, and the females black collar was not so prominent as the male's, and did not extend to the back of the neck. Early travellers reported parrots having a red patch on the shoulders of their wings, a feature which in not seen on either of the two surviving complete specimens, leading to speculation the male specimen is in juvenile plumage.

The early reports suggest that green birds also existed; whether there were two color morphs, or the green coloration was borne by recently-fledged birds, or whether at one time a short-lived colony of a related green species existed on Rodrigues cannot now be determined.

Newton's Parakeets / Rodriguez Ring-necked Parakeets

Newton's Parakeets / Rodriguez Ring-necked Parakeets

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Newton's Parakeets / Rodriguez Ring-necked Parakeets

Newton's Parakeet was 40 cm (16 in) long, about half of the length being the length of its tail feathers.

Its general appearance was similar to the extant Psittacula species, and it had the black collar characteristic of its genus; however, it differed by its slate blue, not green, plumage. The specimens show it had a yellow iris, was a darker grey blue on its upper surfaces than lower surfaces, and the male had a dark line on its face running from its cere to its eyes, which was less prominent in the female.

The female had a greyer head, and the females black collar was not so prominent as the male's, and did not extend to the back of the neck. Early travellers reported parrots having a red patch on the shoulders of their wings, a feature which in not seen on either of the two surviving complete specimens, leading to speculation the male specimen is in juvenile plumage.

The early reports suggest that green birds also existed; whether there were two color morphs, or the green coloration was borne by recently-fledged birds, or whether at one time a short-lived colony of a related green species existed on Rodrigues cannot now be determined.

Orange-cheeked Parrots or Barraband's Parrots

Orange-cheeked Parrots or Barraband's Parrots

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Orange-cheeked Parrots or Barraband's Parrots

Barrabands average 10 inches (25 cm) in length - from head to tip of the tail.

The plumage is generally green. The head is black; the cheeks orange-yellow; the breast and throat olive-yellow; the thighs are yellow; the bend of wing and lesser wing-coverts are orange yellow-red. The edge of the wing and under wing-coverts are orange-red. The primaries (longest wing feathers) and primary wing feathers are virtually black. The middle tail-feathers have a blue tip. The outer tail-feathers have yellow markings to the inner webs. The bill is blackish and the ring around the eyes is whitish. Their irides (= plural of iris) are dark brown and the feet grey.

Females are sexually mature at one year of age and males at two years.

Immatures have a paler coloring to their head. The forehead, nape, cheeks and chin are olive interspersed with brown. The bend of the wing and wing-coverts are green with a few yellow feathers. The edge of the wing and under wing-coverts are interspersed with green.

Orange-chinned parakeets

Orange-chinned parakeets

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Orange-chinned parakeets

The Orange-chinned Parakeet is a small parrot, averaging 7 to 7.2 inches (17.5 - 18 cm) in length and weighing around 2 oz (55 - 65 g).

The overall plumage is green and some of the wing feathers are brown/bronze. There is some brown on the shoulders, and blue on the wings. It is named after the small bright-orange patch of feathers under its beak - although the orange feathers may not be visible depending of this parakeet's posture and the angle it is viewed at. The beak is horn-colored.

Both male and female look identical and must be sexed either by DNA or surgically, if identifying the correct sex is of importance.

Immature birds look like the adults.

Similar Species:

Please note that the Cobalt-winged Parakeet (B. cyanoptera) also has the same bright-orange patch on the "chin" and, therefore, is frequently confused with the orange-chinned parakeet. One easy method for determining the difference is the coloration on the head. Only cobalt wings have yellow feathers around the nostrils. Orange chins also have a stronger yellowish tinge to the green feathers of the breast than other members of the group.

Flocks of these parakeets may also get confused with local conure populations with whom they share the same green plumage, but can be differentiated by their shorter tails. These parakeets also lack the yellow eye ring and orange forehead of the conure species that are common in that range.

Orange-fronted or Red-fronted Parakeet

Orange-fronted Parakeets

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Orange-fronted or Red-fronted Parakeet, Cyanoramphus malherbi

The Malherbe's Parakeet is from 20 - 23 cm or 7.8 - 9 inches long (including the tail). Males usually weigh between 45 - 55 g; females between 38 - 50 g.

The plumage is mostly bright green with a distinctive orange frontal band (from eye to eye). The forecrown is pale lemon-yellow. It has orange patches on each side of the rump. The outer webs of the flight feathers are purple-blue. The bill is blue-grey, tipped with black - with a black cutting edge. The eyes are red.

Gender id: Males and females look alike; except the hen is slightly smaller with a proportionally smaller bill.

Juveniles look like adults, but their frontal band is lighter and more indistinct. The lemon yellow crown is less extensive and paler. The tail is shorter for several weeks after fledging. The bill is pale-pink which gradually darkens as the young bird matures. They have darker red-brown eyes.

Ouvean Parakeets

Ouvean Parakeets

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Uvea or Ouvea Parakeets

The Uvea Parakeet is a parrot found on the island of Ouvea in the Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia. It once ranged across other Loyalty Islands, but attempts to reintroduce this species to Lifou in 1925 and 1963 failed, as the reintroduced birds simply flew back to Ouvea. This being said, nesting success on Lifou is unlikely unless the ship rat populations are controlled.

Their preferred habitat includes natural forests, but they avoid coconut plantations and coastal vegetation.

The Uvea Parakeet is threatened in its natural habitat by capturing for the pet trade and habitat loss as around 30-50% of its habitat has been lost in the last thirty years.