Parrot Species - E through G

Eastern King

Eastern King

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Australian King Parrots aka Eastern Kings, Queensland Kings, King Lories, Scarlet Parrots, Green Parrots

Adults of both sexes are very majestic birds, typically averaging 42 - 43 cm (16 - 17.2 inches) in length, including their long tail.

The adult (>4 years) males are very striking in appearance with a red head, breast, and lower undersides, with a blue lower back, and green wings and tail. They have a reddish-orange upper beak with a black tip and a black lower beak, and yellow eye ring.

These parrots are sexually dimorphic.

Females are similar in appearance except for a green head and breast, a black upper beak, and paler yellow eye ring. Please refer to the below photos.

Juveniles of both sexes resemble the females.

There is one subspecies, A.s. minor, which is found at the northern limit of its range, and is typically about 5 cm (2 inches) shorter than the nominate species but otherwise is similar in appearance.

Eastern Rosellas

Eastern Rosellas

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Eastern Rosellas aka Common Rosellas

This colorful rosella has a red head, upper breast and under tail-coverts. The cheeks are white. The lower breast is yellow becoming yellowish-green on the abdomen. The feathers of the lower breast and abdomen have a fine dark edging. The nape, back and shoulder feathers are black with yellowish-green edging. The inner median wing-coverts are black. The bend of the wing and outer median wing-coverts are blue. The secondary-coverts are pale blue, and the secondaries (shorter, upper "arm" feathers), outer webs at base of primaries (= longest wing feathers) and under wing-coverts are blue. The lower back and upper tail-coverts are pale green with a fine dark edging. The upperside of the middle tail-feathers are dark green with a narrow dark blue edging. The outer tail-feathers are pale blue with a dark blue base and pale tips. The tail underside is pale bluish. The bill is light grey-horn color. They have narrow grey to dark grey eye rings. The irises are dark brown and the feet are grey.

Echo or Mauritius Parakeets

Echo or Mauritius Parakeets

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Echo or Mauritius Parakeets

They average 16.5 inches (42 cm) in length. The plumage is mostly green. The back of the head to the side of cheek area is suffused with blue. There is a broad cheek-stripe to the side of nape and a narrow line from the cere to eye. The collar to the side of the nape is pink. The abdomen and under wing-coverts are a slightly brighter green. The upperside of the tail-feathers are green and the underside dirty yellow. The upper beak is red and the lower lower is black. The irises are yellowish and the feet grey.

Females have a dark green stripe to cheek and they don't have the pink band to the nape. They have a yellow-green collar and lack the blue tinge to back of head. The middle tail-feathers are washed with blue. Their black beak distinguishes them easily from the male that have a red beak.

Immatures look like females, but have shorter tail-feathers.

Echo or Mauritius Parakeets

Echo or Mauritius Parakeets

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Echo or Mauritius Parakeets

They average 16.5 inches (42 cm) in length. The plumage is mostly green. The back of the head to the side of cheek area is suffused with blue. There is a broad cheek-stripe to the side of nape and a narrow line from the cere to eye. The collar to the side of the nape is pink. The abdomen and under wing-coverts are a slightly brighter green. The upperside of the tail-feathers are green and the underside dirty yellow. The upper beak is red and the lower lower is black. The irises are yellowish and the feet grey.

Females have a dark green stripe to cheek and they don't have the pink band to the nape. They have a yellow-green collar and lack the blue tinge to back of head. The middle tail-feathers are washed with blue. Their black beak distinguishes them easily from the male that have a red beak.

Immatures look like females, but have shorter tail-feathers.

Emerald-collared Parakeets

Emerald-collared Parakeets

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Emerald-collared Parakeet / Layard's Parakeet

The plumage is mostly green. It averages 12 inches (29 to 30 cm) in length, with a tail up to 13cm.

The adult has a bluish-grey head and back, separated by a green collar. There is a broad black chin stripe and the tail is blue tipped yellow. The upper part of the male's bill is red, and the lower beak is brown.

The female is similar, but has a black upper beak, and a dark green stripe to the cheek. They lack the pink band to the nape and yellow-green collar. They don't have the blue tinge to back of head that can be seen in the males. The middle tail-feathers are washed with blue.

Immatures as female, but with shorter tail-feathers, with a mainly green plumage and a dark red bill.

Fig Parrots

Fig Parrots

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Fig Parrots

Fig-parrots are distributed throughout various regions of New Guinea and Australia, where they can be found primarily in fruit-bearing trees, especially fig tree. Fig-Parrots are small, predominately green, and leaf shaped. Until about two years of age, male and female fig parrots look the same, then the males begin to color out on the head and the bib.

Fig-parrots are small - most of them are smaller even than budgies. They were named after their favorite food: figs. Their natural diet also includes other fruits, nectar, flowers, bugs and insect larva. Fig Parrots are usually found around figs in tropical rainforest in three very distinctly separated populations along the east coast of Australia, as well as New Guinea. They will also visit figs and other fruiting trees in adjacent woodlands and even urban areas. Fig parrots are difficult to observe in their habitat because of their small size, camouflaging color and rapid movement in forest or near-forest situations. They tend to be high up in the canopy well hidden in the foliage. When engrossed in feeding, observers may hear a variety of soft, chattering noises.

Galah Cockatoo

Galah Cockatoo

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Galah or Rose-breasted Cockatoos / Roseate

The Galah Cockatoo is one of the most common and widespread cockatoos. It occupies open country in almost all parts of mainland Australia. Galahs are found in all Australian states, and are absent only from the driest areas and the far north of Cape York Peninsula. They appear to have been self-introduced to Tasmania.

They are common in some metropolitan areas, for example Perth and Melbourne, and common to abundant in open habitats which offer at least some scattered trees for shelter. The changes wrought by European settlement, a disaster for many species, have been highly beneficial for the Galah because of the clearing of forests in fertile areas and the provision of stock watering points in arid zones.

Geoffroyus

Geoffroyus

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Geoffroyus: Red-cheeked or Long-winged Parrots

Class: Aves ... Order: Psittaciformes ... Family: Psittacidae ... Subfamily: Psittacinae

Genus: Scientific: Geoffroyus ... English: Long-winged Parrots ... Dutch: Langvleugelpapegaaien ... German: Buntkopfpapageien ... French: Perroquet Geoffrey

CITES II: Endangered Species

Golden-mantled Racket-tailed Parrots

Golden-mantled Racket-tailed Parrots

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Golden-mantled Racket-tailed Parrots

These parrots average 11 in (28 cm) in length.

The plumage is generally green. The throat, breast and abdomen are yellowish-gree and they have a rose-red patch to back of crown bordered by dull greyish-blue area. The back is bluish-grey, interspersed with green in some birds. They have a variable orange-yellow band across upper back. The wing-coverts are dull grey and the inner webs of the secondaries (shorter, upper "arm" feathers) have a pale yellow edging. The underside of the wings and tail are greenish-blue. They have two elongated middle tail-feathers with blackish-green spatule-shaped ends. The outer tail-feathers are green with black and blue tips. Their narrow periophthalmic ring is pale grey and the bill sports a pale bluish-horn colour with blackish tip. The irises are dark brown and the feet pale grey.

Female completely green and with shorter tail.

Immatures look like the females, but without the spatule-formed ends to tail-feathers. They attain their adult plumage after about 2 years.

Golden-mantled Rosellas

Golden-mantled Rosellas

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Golden-mantled Rosella

Golden Mantle Rosellas average 12 inches (30 cm) in length.

In the normal form of the Golden Mantle red covers the nape of the neck and extends to the upper breast. The cheek patches are white. Black feathers edged with golden yellow cover the back producing a pearling effect while the wing converts and tail are a bright blue. A green suffusion can be seen on the rump, abdomen and tail.

Hens are often slightly duller in color. In mature Golden Mantle hens of the normal form you can see a white striping under the wing feathers but this is not so when dealing with all the Golden Mantle mutations.

Sexing young birds can prove difficult and DNA sexing may be the only way to know for sure at a young age. However, it may be possible to sex birds that are at least 9 months as the molt into adult plumage. .However birds at least 9 months old can be visualy sexed.

Young birds attain the adult coloration after their second molt - when they are about 12 to 16 months old. At that time they also become sexually mature.

Golden-shouldered or Hooded Parrots aka Golden-tinged Parakeets

Golden-shouldered or Hooded Parrots aka Golden-tinged Parakeets, Chestnut-crowned Parakeets, Antbed Parrots

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Golden-shouldered or Hooded Parrots aka,Golden-tinged Parakeets, Chestnut-crowned Parakeets, Antbed Parrots

The range of the Golden-shouldered ParrotPsephotus chrysopterygius, is limited to the southern Cape York Peninsula in Australia; while its sub-species, the Hooded Parrot, occupies the very north-eastern region of the Northern Territory.

These two races are nearly identical - except the male hooded parrot has black below the eye, while the male golden-shouldered parrot only has black above the eye.

These parrots are about as long as the mulga and blue-bonnet parrots, but they have a slimmer build

This attractive little parrot is related to the more common Red-rumped Parrot. It is considered to be the nominate species of the Hooded Parrot (as mentioned above) and the apparently extinct Paradise Parrot of Queensland and New South Wales in Australia.

Golden-shouldered or Hooded Parrots aka

Golden-shouldered or Hooded Parrots aka,Golden-tinged Parakeets, Chestnut-crowned Parakeets, Antbed Parrots

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Golden-shouldered or Hooded Parrots aka,Golden-tinged Parakeets, Chestnut-crowned Parakeets, Antbed Parrots

His forehead and lores (the regions between the eyes and bill on the side of a bird's head) are lemon-yellow, turning yellowish-green-blue on the upper cheeks. The lower cheeks, throat, breast, sides of body, rump and upper tail-coverts are turquoise. The crown and nape are black. The hindneck are brownish-black with blue edging. The chin has a greyish tinge. The back, lower back and lesser wing-coverts are greyish-brown. The abdomen, under tail-coverts and thighs are orange-red with a white base and edging. The bend of the wing, primary wing feathers, outer webs of primaries (= longest wing feathers), outermost secondaries (shorter, upper "arm" feathers) and under wing-coverts are blue. The inner secondaries are greyish-brown with blue tinge to outer webs. The median wing-coverts are yellow. The upperside of the middle tail-feathers are bronze-green with blue-black tips. The outer tail-feathers are greenish-blue with whitish-blue tips. The tail underside is white-bluish. The bill is grey-horn colored. They have narrow grey periophthalmic rings and brown irises. The feet are greyish-brown.

Lineolated Parakeets or Catherine Parakeets

Golden-winged Parakeets

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Lineolated Parakeets or Catherine Parakeets

The Lineolated Parakeets are small - averaging 1.6 up to 2 ounces (47 to 55 grams) in weight and ~ 6 to 7 inches (~16 to 17 cm) in length. They are slightly larger than budgies.

The natural / wild color is green with each feather being edged in greenish-black. The wing-coverts are bluish-green. The upperside of the tail is dark green with broad black tips. The tail underside is dirty-green. There are black dots on the underside of the body. The beak is horn-colored; the irises are dark grey and the feet are flesh colored to light grey.

Golden-winged Parakeets

Golden-winged Parakeets

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Golden-winged Parakeets

Personality: They are playful and fairly quiet. Some owners report that they can be rather shy. They are sociable, active and love to climb around the branches,

Calls / Vocalizations:

Calls made in flight sound like harsh and scratchy notes repeated quickly up to six times; high pitched notes; and softer, babbling sounds.

Their voice can be loud, although they are not known for extended periods of screeching. They have the ability to learn human speech.

Grass Parakeets / Australian Parakeets

Grass Parakeets / Australian Parakeets

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Grass Parakeets / Parrots

The Bourke's parrot has recently been removed from the Neophema genus and placed in a genus of its own.

Sometimes the broad-tailed parrots are considered a subfamily. In this case, Neophema and Bourke's parrot are united in the tribe Neophemini. mtDNA sequence data (Miyaki et al. 1998) suggests that the former may be correct, but the latter almost certainly isn't. It appears more likely that the group would need to include more closely related forms, such as the budgerigar and the ground-parrots (Pezoporus). 

Grass Parakeets / Parrots

Grass Parakeets / Parrots

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Grass Parakeets / Parrots

The Bourke's parrot has recently been removed from the Neophema genus and placed in a genus of its own.

Sometimes the broad-tailed parrots are considered a subfamily. In this case, Neophema and Bourke's parrot are united in the tribe Neophemini. mtDNA sequence data (Miyaki et al. 1998) suggests that the former may be correct, but the latter almost certainly isn't. It appears more likely that the group would need to include more closely related forms, such as the budgerigar and the ground-parrots (Pezoporus). 

Great-billed Parrots

Great-billed Parrots

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Great-billed Parrots, aka Moluccan Parrots or Island Parrots

This is a medium-sized, 16 to 16.4 (38 - 41 cm) long, green parrot with massive red bill, yellow iris, olive green back and a pale blue rump.

The underparts are yellowish green. The edge of the wing, lesser wing-coverts and shoulder feathers are black. The median wing-coverts are black - each feather has a broad yellow edging. The secondary-coverts are green with yellowish-green edging. The flight feathers are blue with a narrow green edging to the outer webs. The primary wing feathers are blue and the under wing-coverts and sides of breast are yellow. Young birds generally have a duller plumage. The shoulder feathers and wing-coverts are green with a little black. The median wing-coverts have only a narrow pale yellow edging. The irises are dark.

Green Leek Parrots aka Scarlet-breasted Parrots, Superb Parrots, Barraband Parakeets, Barraband Parrots

Green Leek Parrots aka Scarlet-breasted Parrots, Superb Parrots, Barraband Parakeets, Barraband Parrots

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Superb Parrots aka Barraband Parakeets or Parrots aka Scarlet-breasted Parrots

The medium-sized Superb Parrot, Polytelis swainsonii, averages 15.5 to 16 inches (~40 - 45 cm) in length and is predominantly green with long tail feathers. It is yellow-green below.

John Dengate, director of public affairs at New South Wales National Park Services shares the following interesting fact:

Both male and female adults have orange-yellow irises, grey feet, reddish-pink bills, and grey periopthalmic (eye) rings.

The adult male has a bright red band across the upper chest, a bright yellow face and throat, and a slight blue tinge to their napes (lower back of the neck). His primary flight feathers have a blue outer webbing, and the long, pointed tail has a blackish underside. His upper tail is yellow.

The female has an overall duller plumage and lacks the male's red and yellow markings. She has a pale blue-green face, greyish-green throat, a variable tinged russet-pink fore-throat, and orange-yellow thighs. Her under-tail feathers are pink tipped.

Immature birds look like females, but have brown irises. The young male obtains his adult plumage when he is about one year old.

If it is important to identify the gender in juveniles, surgical or DNA sexing is required prior to sexually maturity (about 2 years).

Green Parrots aka Australian King Parrots, Queensland King, King Lory, Scarlet Parrot

Green Parrots aka Australian King Parrots, Queensland King, King Lory, Scarlet Parrot

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Australian King Parrots aka Eastern Kings, Queensland Kings, King Lories, Scarlet Parrots, Green Parrots

Adults of both sexes are very majestic birds, typically averaging 42 - 43 cm (16 - 17.2 inches) in length, including their long tail.

The adult (>4 years) males are very striking in appearance with a red head, breast, and lower undersides, with a blue lower back, and green wings and tail. They have a reddish-orange upper beak with a black tip and a black lower beak, and yellow eye ring.

These parrots are sexually dimorphic.

Females are similar in appearance except for a green head and breast, a black upper beak, and paler yellow eye ring. Please refer to the below photos.

Juveniles of both sexes resemble the females.

There is one subspecies, A.s. minor, which is found at the northern limit of its range, and is typically about 5 cm (2 inches) shorter than the nominate species but otherwise is similar in appearance.

Green Rosellas

Green Rosellas

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Green Rosellas also called the Tasmanian Rosellas, or Yellow-bellied, Mountain or Green Parrots

The Green Rosella is Australia's largest rosella at an average length of 14.4 - 14.5 ins. or 36 - 37 cm (including tail), although it is only considered medium-sized when compared to the other parrot species.

The upperparts are dark, mottled green and black - in contrast with the yellow head, neck and underbody. When flying the bright yellow body is very obvious. There are distinct blue cheek patches, a red band across the forehead, and blue shoulder patches. It has a broad tail.

Females are smaller and slightly duller.

Sexing young birds can prove difficult and DNA sexing may be the only way to know for sure at a young age. However, it may be possible to sex birds that are at least 9 months as the molt into adult plumage.

Green-winged King Parrots

Green-winged King Parrots

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Green-winged King Parrots or Papuan King Parrots

Adults of both sexes are very majestic birds, typically 36 cm (14 inches) in length, including the long tail.

The adult males (older than 4 years) are very striking in appearance. Their plumage is mostly red. They have a variable blue band on the nape and upper back. The back and shoulder feathers are greenish-black. They have a pale yellowish-green band on the wing-coverts (not yellow as occasionally wrongly described - this band is a darker - a medium green in the subspecies). The remainder of the wing is dark green. The lower back, the upper tail-coverts and the rump is blue. The under tail-coverts are scarlet with a dark blue base. The upperside of the tail is black strongly tinged with blue. The tail underside is greyish-black.

They have a reddish-orange upper beak with a black tip and a black lower beak. The irises are orange and the feet are grey.

These parrots are sexually dimorphic.

Grey Parrots

Grey Parrots

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African Grey Parrot aka Grey Parrots: The Smartest Parrots of all?

These popular avian pets have the reputation for being amongst the most intelligent of all birds. They are in demand because of their human-like ability to mimic speech and generally gentle nature.

The most famous African Grey parrot was called Alex. In 1977, Dr. Irene Pepperberg purchased him from a pet store hoping to disprove that Parrots were just mimics. In the more than 30 years that she worked with him, Alex has shown amazing cognitive abilities, being able to name more than 100 objects, actions and colors. Alex was able to identify certain objects by their particular material. Sadly, Alex died in 2007.

Pocket Parrots

Grey-cheeked Parakeetsalso known as Grey Cheek Parakeets, Pocket Parrots, Orange Flanked Parakeets, Orange Winged Parakeets

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Grey-cheeked Parakeetsalso known as Grey Cheek Parakeets, Pocket Parrots, Orange Flanked Parakeets, Orange Winged Parakeets

Grey-cheeks average 8 inches or 20 cm in length (including tail) and weigh 54-60 grams, which means that they are a little larger than lovebirds in size.

Grey-cheeked Parakeets are named after their distinctive grey cheeks, chin and forehead. The plumage is generally green; however,they have a dusky blue crown and bright orange feathers on the underwing coverts.

The throat, upperbreast, abdomen, thighs and under tail-coverts are yellowish-green. The under wing-coverts orange-red; lesser and median wing-coverts are tinged witholive-brown. The primary coverts are dark-blue. The primaries (longest wing feathers) are green tinged with blue. The secondary wing feathersare green.

The bill is horn-colored. The irises are dark brown. The feet are flesh-colored.

Young birds look like adults, but they generally have a slightlyduller plumage. Until they are approximately 6 months old, grey cheeks have black or spotty, black beaks. As they mature, their beaks turn horn-colored.

Grey cheeks are not sexually dimorphic (meaning, both sexes look alike) and need DNA testing to determine their sex.

Grey-cheeks vocalize quite loudly and their calls are described as quick, sharp screeches and may involve many monotone screeches in succession.

Guaiabero Parrots

Guaiabero Parrots

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Bolbopsittacus: Guaiabero Parrots

The bird genus Bolbopsittacus - includes a group of parrots that are more commonly known as Guaiabero Parrots.

They occur naturally on the island of Luzon in the Philippines.