Pallas's Warblers or Pallas's Leaf Warblers

 

Leaf Warblers

 

Palla's WarblersThe Pallas's Warbler or Pallas's Leaf Warbler (Phylloscopus proregulus) is a leaf warbler which breeds in southern Siberia, Mongolia and parts of Tibet and China. It is strongly migratory and winters in subtropical Asia.

This is a bird of coniferous mountain woodlands. The nest is built in a tree. Like most Old World warblers, this small passerine is insectivorous.

This tiny warbler is prone to vagrancy as far as western Europe in late October and November, despite a 3000 km distance from its breeding grounds. For example, this species occurs in late autumn in Great Britain regularly enough that it is not classified as rare there.

  • The closely related southern species, Pale-rumped Warbler (or Lemon-rumped Warbler), P. chloronotus, and Gansu Leaf Warbler, P. kansuensis, move to lower latitudes in winter, but do not migrate long distances.

  • The Simla Warbler is the westernmost subspecies P. chloronotus simlaensis which may be anything between a distinct species and invalid due to clinal variation (Alström 2006 [2]).

  • These three or four species and the Chinese Leaf-warbler, P. yunnanensis (sometimes P. sichuanensis) were until recently united in the Pallas' Warbler sensu lato.

Note that the sixth edition of Clements checklist [3] refers to Pallas's Grasshopper Warbler, rather than this species, as "Pallas's Warbler".

This bird is named after the German zoologist Peter Simon Pallas.

 

Description:

This is one of the smallest warblers, and shares greenish upperparts and off-white underparts with typical leaf warblers. However, this is a little jewel of a bird, with prominent double wing bars, supercilia and crown stripe, and a lemon-yellow rump.

This bird is not shy, but its arboreal life style makes it difficult to observe. It is constantly in motion, and often hovers briefly, like a kinglet. Its song is powerful and Canary-like.

 

Copyright: Wikipedia. This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from Wikipedia.org ... Additional information and photos added by Avianweb.


 

Please Note: The articles or images on this page are the sole property of the authors or photographers. Please contact them directly with respect to any copyright or licensing questions. Thank you.