Lories in Captivity - as Pets, Aviary Birds or Breeders

Yellow streaked lory – Chalcopsitta scintillate

Lories in Captivity - as Pets, Aviary Birds or Breeders

Lories and Lorikeets: Overview (Naming, Range and Description)


 

The below Information has kindly been provided by Dr. Rob Marshall, Avian Vet.

 

Lories as Pets:

There are a number of lorikeets varieties that appeal as pet birds. These varieties can be divided into two main groups - the Small Australian Lorikeets, and the larger tropical lorikeets. The lorikeet is a playful and energetic bird and in its natural environment eats nectar and fruits rather than seeds. It requires a specialised diet of a nectar mix, fruit and vegetables.

Lorikeets are very untidy eaters and spoil the cage and its surrounds with their large, wet droppings. These messy eating habits require a diligent owner who is willing to clean the cage every day to prevent bacterial and yeast (thrush) infections.

The smaller lorikeet varieties (varied and musk) make better pets because of their soft bite, but well-trained rainbow or red-collared lorikeets are good talkers and a lot of fun.

Lorikeets are extremely playful and love to listen to music and dance. They form strong bonds with their owner and make excellent pets for those willing to provide the specialised care required by the lorikeet. This includes providing wet mix or nectar as a food source and ensuring the cage is kept clean despite a very messy bird.

As with any parrot species, it is best to obtain a hand reared male bird from aviary bred parents.

 

Small Australian Lorikeets

The Small Australian Lorikeets are playful and have a delightful personality. These endearing birds do not share the talking abilities of the larger tropical lorikeets but remain remarkable pets for those seeking a colourful and charming small pet bird. The quiet nature of the Small Australian Lorikeets varieties, make them particularly suitable for people who live in units or places where noise must be kept to a minimum. Male hand reared lorikeets, particularly the Varied Lorikeet (Psitteiteles versicolor), make the best pets.

Aviary Notes

Small Australian lorikeets are successfully bred in both large communal aviaries and in suspended single pair cages. These birds can also be housed in a planted aviary in a mixed finch/dove collection.

 

Larger Tropical Lorikeets

The larger lorikeets are highly intelligent and make excellent pets for those seeking a playful and energetic bird. All species are strikingly beautiful with their varied colours and stunning glossy plumage. As with any lorikeet species, they have special dietary requirements, and must be provided with nectar and wet/dry mix.

The larger lorikeets make excellent talkers but can become extremely noisy and require a committed owner who is willing to provide continuing obedience training. With a very curious nature, the larger lorikeets have a tremendous mimicking ability and will often be heard imitating household appliances such as the telephone or microwave.

Aviary Notes

The boisterous nature of the larger lorikeet species demands an aviary no less then four to six metres long and one to two metres high. The best breeding results are achieved when the correct housing and nutritional care are provided. Lorikeets particularly like eucalypt branches in the aviary.

 

Rosenberg's Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus rosenbergii)

 
 

Lories in Captivity:

Lories are popular companion birds due to their intelligence, entertaining personality and stunning beauty. They are also quite easily bred, so there are readily available. They reach maturity at 8 mos or later. Males and females look alike and breeders depend on DNA or endoscopic sexing to determine sex.

They are affectionate, curious, extroverted and clowny and exhibit some unique behaviors. Some like to wrap themselves up in a blanket for sleeping. At times, they can even be seen sleeping on their backs. They are capable of aggressive behavior if their territory and possessions are not respected. They are demanding in care requirements (especially diet preparations) and require a lot of attention. Daily baths or showers should be part of their grooming regimen.

They are trainable and, with a little patience and know-how, can be trained to eliminate in a certain area on cue. This webpage will provide you with instructions.

Their voice ranges from loud, piercing whistles and metallic "pings" to soft, high-pitched warbles and chattering.

 

Yellow-streaked Lory (Chalcopsitta sintillata sintillata) -- also known as Yellowish or Glossy LoryLories as Pets or in Aviculture:

Lories are typically quite easily bred, so many lory species are readily available. Their expected lifespan is 28+ years, provided their specific dietary needs are met. They reach maturity at 8 months or later. Males and females look alike and breeders depend on DNA or endoscopic sexing to determine their gender.

Positive aspects of lory ownership ...

Lories are popular companion birds due to their intelligence, entertaining personality and stunning beauty. Most stay tame, even in maturity.

They are affectionate, curious, extroverted and clowny and exhibit some unique behaviors. Some like to wrap themselves up in a blanket for sleeping. At times, they can even be seen sleeping on their backs.

They are known for their playfulness. In their eyes, everything is a toy. They love toys that make noise, such as bells. They enjoy hanging on ropes and are quite "mechanical." They like "toys" that can be taken apart -- and they are GOOD at it! Lories are very active and require large cages (preferably flights) and lots of supervised out-of-cage time.

What makes them challenging to own ...

They are capable of aggressive behavior if their territory and possessions are not respected. Housing two lories together can result in injury, unless they are a bonded pair.

They are demanding in care requirements (especially diet preparations) and require a lot of attention. Daily baths or showers should be part of their grooming regimen.

Due to their diet which consists for the most part of fruits and nectar, their droppings are very runny and messy. Special adaptations around the cage are recommended. Carpet underneath a cage will be the poorest choice of all. Everything in the vicinity of the cage should be easy to clean. This being said, lories are very trainable and, with a little patience and know-how, can be taught to eliminate in a certain area on cue. This webpage will provide you with instructions.

Their voice ranges from loud, piercing whistles and metallic "pings" to soft, high-pitched warbles and chattering.


Other Relevant Web Resources


Green-naped Lory


 

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