Green-rumped Parrotlets aka Guiana Parrotlets

Green-rumped Parrotlets aka Guiana Parrotlets

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Green-rumped Parrotlets

 

Green-rumped ParrotletDistribution

The Green-rumped Parrotlet aka Guiana Parrotlet (Forpus passerinus passerinus or Forpus guianensis ) is restricted to French Guiana, Suriname and Guyana. The birds introduced to Martinique may also have been of this race.

 

Personality

The Green-rump Parrotlet is one of the least aggressive parrotlets and is, therefore, often considered as an alternative to the more bold and territorial Pacific Parrotlet. The Green-ump is very shy (especially initially and with new people), and they are very gentle creatures. They need a safe and stable environment to thrive. The Pacific Parrotlet is more resilient in its nature.

 

Description

The male is mainly emerald-green in coloration, over the forehead and cheeks, with a grayish suffusion to the nape and hindneck. The underparts are also emerald-green, as is the lower back and rump, although pale blue suffusion may be apparent on the green of the lower back. The bend of the wing and the carpal edge (= leading edge of the wing at the "shoulder") are blue. Both the under wing-coverts and the primary coverts are violet-blue, with the secondaries (shorter, upper "arm" feathers) being a paler shade of blue. The lower surface of the flight feathers is bluish green, while the tail feathers are entirely green, but of a paler shade underneath. The beak is whitish pink and the legs are pinkish. The eyes (irises) are dark brown.

Hens can be distinguished easily because they lack the blue plumage evident in cocks. The forehead is also more brightly colored, being a strong shade of yellowish green.

Young Birds resemble adults in appearance.

 
 

Taxonomy

Distribution: Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana

Genus: Scientific: Forpus ... English: Parrotlets ... Dutch: Muspapegaaien ... German: Sperlingspapageien ... French: Perruche moineau

Species: Scientific: Forpus passerinus passerinus aka Forpus guianensis ... English: Green-rumped Parrotlet, Guiana Parrotlet ... Dutch: Groene Muspapegaai, Blauwvleugelige Dwergpapegaai ... German: Grünbürzel Sperlingspapagei ... French: Perruche moineau de Guyane

Sub-Species / Races Including Nominate: cyanophanes, viridessimus, passerinus, cyanochlorus, deliciosus

CITES II - Endangered Species

 
 

Sub-species:

 

Venezuelan Green Parrotlets aka Caracas Parrotlets or Venezuelan Green-rumped Parrotlets (Forpus passerinus viridissimus)

 

Rio Hacha Parrotlets:

Also known as the Rio Hacha Parrotlet.

Distribution: Confined to northern Colombia, inhabiting an area to the east of the Santa Marta Mountains. It extends southwards in a strip bordered also by the Sierra de Perija via the valley of the Cesare River, reaching Camperucho.

Description: Similar to F. p. viridissimus, in the case of the cock, but distinguishable by the more widespread violet-blue plumage over the primary and secondary coverts, which is noticeable when the bird is resting. In addition, the under wing-coverts are also more prominently marked with violet-blue. Hens of this race are apparently identical to those of F. p. passerinus.

Taxonomy: Genus: Scientific: Forpus ... English: Parrotlets ... Dutch: Muspapegaaien ... German: Sperlingspapageien ... French: Perruche moineau ... Species: Scientific: Forpus passerinus cyanophanes ... English: Rio Hacha Parrotlet ... Dutch: Rio Hacha Groene Muspapegaai ... German: Ria Hacha Grünbürzel Sperlingspapagei ... French: Perruche moineau de Guyana Césare ... CITES II - Endangered Species

 

Santarém Passerin Parrotlets aka Delicate Parrotlets:

This race is sometimes described as the Delicate Parrotlet. [The Atlas of Parrots, Dr. David Alderton (1991)]

Distribution: Found in northern Brazil, in the vicinity of the Amazon River extending from the lower Madeira River in eastern Amazonas eastwards as far as the Anapu River in Para. Also ranges further east on the northern side, reaching Macapa in Amapa.

Description: Resembles the nominate race, but the emerald-green of the lower back and rump is heavily suffused with pale blue, with the upper tail coverts being greenish yellow in the case of the cock. The secondaries (shorter, upper "arm" feathers) are violet-blue, with pale green edges, while the greater upper wing-coverts are similarly colored along their shafts, and pale blue elsewhere. Hens have a more prominent area of yellow on the forehead than those of F. p. passerinus.

Taxonomy: Genus: Scientific: Forpus ... English: Parrotlets ... Dutch: Muspapegaaien ... German: Sperlingspapageien ... French: Perruche moineau ... Species: Scientific: Forpus passerinus deliciosus ... English: Santarém Passerin Parrotlet ... Dutch: Amazone Groene Muspapegaai ... German: Amazonas Grünbürzel Sperlingspapagei ... French: Perruche moineau de Guyana Ridgeway ... CITES II - Endangered Species

 

Schlegel's Parrotlets:

Distribution: The Schlegel's Parrotlet is also known as Hartlaub's Parrotlet. This parrotlet is found only in the vicinity of the upper Rio Branco, in Roraima, Brazil.

Description: The Schlegel's Parrotlet is very similar to the nominate species, F. p. passerinus, but is a yellower shade of green on the underparts, as well as on the lower back and rump. The beak is also said to be somewhat smaller.

Taxonomy: Genus: Scientific: Forpus ... English: Parrotlets ... Dutch: Muspapegaaien ... German: Sperlingspapageien ... French: Perruche moineau ... Species: Scientific: Forpus passerinus cyanochlorus ... English: Schlegel's Parrotlet ... Dutch: Schlegels Groene Muspapegaai ... German: Schlegels Grünbürzel Sperlingspapagei ... French: Perruche moineau de Guyana Branco ... CITES II - Endangered Species

 

Species Research by Sibylle Johnson

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